10 Anti-Trafficking Social Enterprises

anti-trafficking

Human trafficking is transporting, recruiting and harbouring of people forcefully for the purpose of exploitation. Human trafficking results into sexual slavery, forced labour, modern slavery and commercial sexual exploitation. Trafficking is not only restricted to women and children but even men are forced to do labour. It is one of the hidden professions of the world. Hence, because of its hidden nature, it is critical to determine the actual statistics. It is the third largest organised crime followed by drugs and ammunition trade. These trafficked people are sold and resold, as a result, they make it their profession. Impactpreneurs lists few Indian not-for-profits that are rehabilitating, rescuing and repatriating the victims of human trafficking.
1.  Bachpan Bachao Andolan (BBA)

Bachpan Bachao Andolan
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  • Aim: To combat the injustice towards children in the society.
  • Programmes: In 2001, BBA had organised a long march of 15,000 km called Siksha Yatra across India to promote quality education for children. Their proposed model, ‘Child Friendly Villages’ (Bal Mitra Gram) has been universally accepted. Moreover, they have organised many campaigns like Anti-Firecracker Campaign, Global March Against Child Labour and  Child Labour Free India Campaign among others to combat against child labour.
  • Amazing Factor: The founder, Kailash Satyarthi was awarded Nobel Peace Prize in  2014.

2.  Sanlaap India

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  • Aim: To attain gender equality and end the social injustice prevailing in the society.
  • Programmes: Few programmes organised by Sanlaap India to combat human trafficking are  Sneha, Child Protection Programme, Swaastha, Youth Programme, Sundar, Campaign Programme. Moreover, their initiation called Srijoni is an effort towards economic rehabilitation. Through these programmes, they are relighting hope in the victims of trafficking.
  • Amazing Factor: Sanlaap India had received the award, Bal Kalyan Puraskar in 1997 by the Hon’ble President of India.

3.  Rescue Foundation

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Protection home of the Rescue Foundation

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  • Aim: To rescue, rehabilitate and repatriate the victims of human trafficking.
  • Programmes: The organisation is operational in India, Bangladesh and Nepal. They also provide legal aid, psycho-social counselling, health care, training, safety and nutrition to the victims of human trafficking and forced prostitution.
  • Amazing Factor: They have been felicitated with Woman of Peace from the USA.

4.  Prerana

uplifts the victims of human-trafficking
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  • Aim: To put an end to second generation prostitution and uplift the lives of the victims of trafficking.
  • Programmes: On encouragement from the Department of State for the US Government, Prerana started Anti-Trafficking Center (ATC) which is one of its kind. At ATC, stakeholders and passionate people come together to discuss the issues related to human trafficking. Under Naunihal Girls’ Shelter programme, they have sheltered 32 girls. Moreover, they have also initiated a programme called Aarambh (start) through which they aim to safeguard the children from sexual abuse.
  • Amazing Factor: Till date, they have positively impacted 10,000 (directly) and 15,000 (indirectly) lives of sex-workers’ children. In 2007, UNAIDS awarded them Civil Society Award for aiding the children affected by HIV/AIDS.

5.  STOP India

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  • Aim: To eradicate human trafficking and put an end to the violence against women and children.
  • Programmes: Apart from their Ashray Family Home, legal and community intervention programmes, their rescue operations outshine among all. STOP has two types of rescue operations; brothel-based and community-based. In the brothel-based-operation, they convince the minor girls to leave the brothel and start a new life. In this process, they face a lot of problems as it becomes very tough for them to make the girls trust them. On the other hand, the community-based rescue operation involves the intervention of the police. Under this operation, STOP has its own vigilante group of women called STOP’s Community Vigilante Group who are assisted by the police. This group aims to combat the exploitation issues in the community. These issues include domestic violence, sexual assault, forced domestic labour and forced marriage.
  • Amazing Factor: Ashray Family Home is a shelter for 60-70 children at any point of time in a year.

6.  Arz (Anyay Rahit Zindagi)

posters against human trafficking
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  • Aim: To combat trafficking in Goa.
  • Programmes: They have launched a non-residential economic rehabilitation unit called Swift Wash for the people who have come out of sexual exploitation. They are offered Rs. 5500 as salary with other benefits like ESI, provident fund, free education for school going children, computer training etc.
  • Amazing Factor: Goa police has appointed Arz as the Nodal NGO of integrated anti-human trafficking unit. They were awarded by the Ministry of Home Affairs in 2012.

7.  Prajwala

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  • Aim: To abolish human trafficking.
  • Programmes: They have organised various programmes to rescue, rehabilitate, advocate, prevent and reintegrate the women and children.
  • Amazing Factor: The co-founder, Sunitha Krishnan has been awarded Padma Shri which is India’s fourth highest civilian award. She has been globally acknowledged with various accolades for her contribution against trafficking of children and women.

8.  Freedom Firm

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  • Aim: To restore the victims of sex-trafficking.
  • Programmes: Following are the programs:
    Rescue: Freedom Firm has its own undercover investigators who monitor the sex-trafficking areas in India. With the help of hidden cameras, they identify the minor victims, pimps, brothel keepers and traffickers. Subsequently, with the help of police, they rescue the victims of sex-trafficking.
    Restoration: After rescuing the girls, they are put in the local government remand home. Freedom Firm’s Aftercare Program consists social workers who provide counselling, smooth care, education and employment. Freedom Firm’s Ruhamah Designs employs the women who are rescued from trafficking. They also have another programme called Leg Up. Through Leg Up, victims of forced prostitution and disabled children are healed through horse related activities.
    Justice: Freedom Firm has a legal team who struggles to convict the brothel keepers and traffickers.
  • Amazing Factor: The victims of sex-trafficking are treated with hate, violence, abuse and degradation. Freedom Firm organises avalanche camps where these victims are treated with love and exposed to the beauty of nature. It is an approach to provide a healthy and relaxing atmosphere.

9.  Apne Aap Women Worldwide

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  • Aim: To eradicate sex-trafficking.
  • Programmes: Apart from organising campaigns and filing petitions, they publish a monthly newsletter called Red Light Dispatch. This newsletter is written by and also for the women of the red-light area. Through this, they raise voice against the injustice done to them.
  • Amazing Factor: The founder, Ruchira Gupta, apart from handling the organisation has designed three courses at New York University. These courses are Human Trafficking as Gender Based Violence, Movement Building to end Sex-Trafficking and Modern Day Slavery which she teaches in the university.

10.  Shakti Vahini

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  • Aim: To attain just, free and equitable society.
  • Programmes: Apart from organising campaigns and advocacy, they also do possible interventions through protests and mass mobilisations. Moreover, they also provide training and workshops to the trafficked victims.
  • Amazing Factor: Shakti Vahini has been appointed as the Member of the Central Advisory Committee to combat human trafficking. They have been appointed by the Ministry of Women and Child, Government of India.

To know more about such enterprises, visit Impactpreneurs.

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